Page 38 - Athletic Health Handbook
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SPORTS MEDICINE
CONCEPTS

WHAT TITLE IX MEANS TO
WOMEN’S ATHLETICS TODAY

DIONNE L. KOLLER TITLE IX TURNED FORTY IN 2012, and this past
Associate Professor of Law
Director, Center for Sport and the Law summer was filled with celebrations and pointed reminders—such as the
University of Baltimore School of Law accomplishments of our women Olympians—of the law’s enormous success.
Title IX has been widely credited with changing norms for sports participation
for women, and unlike many laws, whose actual efficacy in this regard
is debated, the numbers don’t lie.

Since its enactment in 1972, Title IX’s ability to change the culture
surrounding women’s participation in athletics and bring steadily-increasing
numbers of women into sports has been dramatic. Prior to the enactment
of Title IX, fewer than 32,000 women participated in intercollegiate athletics.
Now, there are more than 174,000 female intercollegiate athletes. Female
participation in interscholastic athletics has grown even more, with about

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